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Hi 👋 

New to this diet, Any one has existing and delicious recipes? Currently im eating mostly 70/30 ground beef and I would love good recipes of cheap cuts of beef, how to slow cook and which cuts and so on.

Recipes for fish like salmon is also good.

Would love to get some of your great ideas 

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One of my favorites is to take a cheap cut of beef, venison, lamb or pork. Cube it into large bite sized chunks and put them in a crockpot. Pour enough bone broth over the meat until it almost covers it. Add salt to taste. Turn the temperature to high and wait 3 hours.
Now I don’t know wether to call this a meat stew or soup but is good and savory. The meat is tender and delicious. Great on a chilly day.


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Since I've been carnivore I have been a bit of a boring chef, which is too bad because I can cook and am otherwise creative. But with meat, it's basically heat and eat.

I do like to combine things together. Like beef, bacon, sausage, egg, and butter. Mix it all up. 

I still do seasonings from time to time, which some overzealous carnivores will be critical of. That's why I say I am "97% Carnivore".

You should check out the "What's fer supper!" topic for some ideas.

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5 hours ago, Geezy said:

One of my favorites is to take a cheap cut of beef, venison, lamb or pork. Cube it into large bite sized chunks and put them in a crockpot. Pour enough bone broth over the meat until it almost covers it. Add salt to taste. Turn the temperature to high and wait 3 hours.
Now I don’t know wether to call this a meat stew or soup but is good and savory. The meat is tender and delicious. Great on a chilly day.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

How do I make the bone broth

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How do I make the bone broth

Bone Broth
Ingredients

4 oz of mixed animal bones
2 teaspoons salt (Optional). I recommend pink Himalayan salt for a carnivore diet.
4l water. You need enough water to cover the bones so you have a 1:2 ratio for the finished product. Tip: You can adjust the amount of water to have a denser or lighter broth, according to your preference.
Optional vinegar. You can add vinegar to leach out the minerals if desired. If you choose to add apple cider vinegar, go for two tablespoons.
Instructions

Preheat the oven to 230 degrees.
Take out a deep roasting tray and arrange the bones in a single layer. Sprinkle salt on the bones and roast for about half an hour. Turn the bones around halfway, so they are evenly roasted. The roasting is done when the bones are caramelized and brown in color. This step is optional, and you can skip the bone roasting.
Move all the bones and the juices into a pot. Add water and vinegar if desired. Bring the bones to a boil and then reduce the heat to low, so it simmers.
Skim the foam every 15 minutes for the first two hours to have a clear broth.
Cook for at least 18 to 24 hours. Add extra water if needed. The bones should be covered at all times.
Let the broth cool slightly and strain with a fine-mesh strainer or a cheesecloth.
Store the broth in glass jars in the fridge for up to five days, or freeze for up to six months.
Recipe Tips

Here’s what to keep in mind when cooking homemade broth:

How long you should cook the broth depends on the bones you’re using. For example, cook fish broth for about two hours, chicken broth for up to 12 hours, and beef, lamb, pork, and veal broth for 24 hours.
Simmer for longer if you want to save and eat marrow bones for calcium.
You can also cook the broth in the slow cooker.
Keep the kitchen fan on during the cooking to help with the stink.
You don’t have to skim the foam at the top. The foam is just protein and fat, so it’s pure animal food. Skimming gives a clear broth, but leave the foam if you don’t mind a darker color.
You can use bone broth in other recipes instead of water. For example, add nourishing broth, braised meat, scrambled eggs, and pate.

I personally don’t make my own because I can just by it in the grocery store.
This is what I use. It’s the cleanest I could find.
19bba2d7910225e0bfaefc7b1ebd6221.jpg

I don’t know if you can find anything similar in your country.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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15 minutes ago, Geezy said:


Bone Broth
Ingredients

4 oz of mixed animal bones
2 teaspoons salt (Optional). I recommend pink Himalayan salt for a carnivore diet.
4l water. You need enough water to cover the bones so you have a 1:2 ratio for the finished product. Tip: You can adjust the amount of water to have a denser or lighter broth, according to your preference.
Optional vinegar. You can add vinegar to leach out the minerals if desired. If you choose to add apple cider vinegar, go for two tablespoons.
Instructions

Preheat the oven to 230 degrees.
Take out a deep roasting tray and arrange the bones in a single layer. Sprinkle salt on the bones and roast for about half an hour. Turn the bones around halfway, so they are evenly roasted. The roasting is done when the bones are caramelized and brown in color. This step is optional, and you can skip the bone roasting.
Move all the bones and the juices into a pot. Add water and vinegar if desired. Bring the bones to a boil and then reduce the heat to low, so it simmers.
Skim the foam every 15 minutes for the first two hours to have a clear broth.
Cook for at least 18 to 24 hours. Add extra water if needed. The bones should be covered at all times.
Let the broth cool slightly and strain with a fine-mesh strainer or a cheesecloth.
Store the broth in glass jars in the fridge for up to five days, or freeze for up to six months.
Recipe Tips

Here’s what to keep in mind when cooking homemade broth:

How long you should cook the broth depends on the bones you’re using. For example, cook fish broth for about two hours, chicken broth for up to 12 hours, and beef, lamb, pork, and veal broth for 24 hours.
Simmer for longer if you want to save and eat marrow bones for calcium.
You can also cook the broth in the slow cooker.
Keep the kitchen fan on during the cooking to help with the stink.
You don’t have to skim the foam at the top. The foam is just protein and fat, so it’s pure animal food. Skimming gives a clear broth, but leave the foam if you don’t mind a darker color.
You can use bone broth in other recipes instead of water. For example, add nourishing broth, braised meat, scrambled eggs, and pate.

I personally don’t make my own because I can just by it in the grocery store.
This is what I use. It’s the cleanest I could find.
19bba2d7910225e0bfaefc7b1ebd6221.jpg

I don’t know if you can find anything similar in your country.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Thanks

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